Friday, 5 December 2014

Dorothy Caldwell Silent Ice Deep Patience @ AGP 10

Dorothy Caldwell Fjord, 2008; Photo © Karen Thiessen, 2014
Fjord, How Do We Know It's Night? and Signs are all monumental. Fjord is 8'6" X 8'8" and is the oldest textile in the exhibition.
Dorothy Caldwell Fjord, 2008; Photo © Karen Thiessen, 2014
The details are gorgeous. I especially enjoy the appliqués of older textiles.
Dorothy Caldwell Fjord, 2008; Photo © Karen Thiessen, 2014
As always, the stitching is exquisite.
Dorothy Caldwell Signs, 2014; Photo © Karen Thiessen, 2014
Signs is 8'9" X 8'8". I would love to have a close look at the upper details.
Dorothy Caldwell Signs, 2014; Photo © Karen Thiessen, 2014
A discharged appliqué with acid green couched thread.
Dorothy Caldwell Signs, 2014; Photo © Karen Thiessen, 2014
Dorothy Caldwell Signs, 2014; Photo © Karen Thiessen, 2014
Dorothy brings the back to the front with white couched thread over white silkscreen resist lines.
Dorothy Caldwell Signs, 2014; Photo © Karen Thiessen, 2014
Dorothy Caldwell How Do We Know When It's Night?, 2010; Photo © Karen Thiessen, 2014
How Do We Know It's Night is 10' X 9'6" and is the largest and second oldest textile in the exhibition. 
Dorothy Caldwell How Do We Know When It's Night?, 2010; Photo © Karen Thiessen, 2014
 Appliqués border the textile.
Dorothy Caldwell How Do We Know When It's Night?, 2010; Photo © Karen Thiessen, 2014
I counted seven lines (six strands each) of white and off-white embroidery floss.
Dorothy Caldwell How Do We Know When It's Night?, 2010; Photo © Karen Thiessen, 2014
Another appliqué of old textiles. 

All photos were taken with permission from Dorothy Caldwell and the fine staff of the Art Gallery of Peterborough.

5 comments:

Judy Martin said...

Thank you for these details of Dorothy's work.

Also Karen, thank you for your thorough look at this exhibit. You've given all of us Caldwell lovers a research base.

x

Jennifer said...

Bliss. Just sheer bliss.

I saw the last, How Do We Know It's Night, in 2012 at the Snyderman Gallery in Philadelphia as part of FiberPhiladelphia. It is exquisite. I could have stood in front of it all night.

Thank you so much for sharing your photos of Dorothy's exhibit in such detail. Almost as good as being there. Do you happen to know where the exhibition goes next?

Nina OConnor said...

Thank you so much for your beautiful photographs and detailed record of Dorothy Caldwell's work. I am studying for a Textile degree with The Open College of Arts and working on a sketchbook inspired by her amazing stitching and mark-making.

Karen said...

You're welcome! Writing about Dorothy was daunting and I learned a lot from close looking and reflection in the process.

downwarddogfibers.com said...

Great post, lovely photos!